13 is for change

After the announcement of the 13th Doctor, I found myself thinking a bit about representation. I wanted to write a blog post on the topic, but shied away from it, as I was unsure of my footing. There are other voices than mine that can speak with greater experience and truth on this. And so I didn’t write that post. This is a different one.


Black Panther hit the cinemas with enough force to rattle the internet in February 2018. It had in it (by my count and if you exclude the last post-credit scene and Stan Lee’s obligatory cameo) two named white characters. One was Ulysses Klaue, and his final moment in the MCU was to be reduced to a plot point by Eric Killmonger. A suitable comeuppance, although I’m sad to see Andy Serkis leave the franchise. The other was Everett Ross, and perhaps there is something to be said for fixing broken white boys, because Ross transitioned nicely into the role of helper, not leader. It was refreshing to watch.

And it was more than just refreshing to see the host of excellent, three-dimensional characters that made up the rest of the cast, from the funny, super-smart and indomitable Shuri effortlessly developing and piloting her wonderful tech; the utterly capable and honourable Okoye struggling with the oaths to the throne whilst leading the awesome Dora Milaje; the strong and outward-looking Nakia; the righteous and merciful T’Challa; to the intimidating and undoubtedly nasty, but still highly relatable, Killmonger, who shared an absolutely harrowing and multi-layered scene with his father N’Jobu. It was more than just refreshing. It was about time.

I’ve heard it said that representation should come ‘naturally’, that it should not be ‘forced’, that we should be ‘blind’ to categories of privilege and so not actively ‘push’ for inclusion of those historically marginalised. I think that is a pile of bovine droppings.

Change doesn’t come easy. It doesn’t come by ambling unobstructed into some utopian land. It comes by work – hard work – in the face of opposition. The same opposition that is annoyed at ‘forced’ inclusion but oblivious to forced exclusion. The same forced exclusion that has for centuries, through sheer weight of history, come to look normal. Change will remove privileges. One of these is the privilege to see almost exclusively people like oneself on screen and on paper, in active roles, driving the story. I enjoy that privilege in part, whether I want to or not, and I am glad to see it frayed, showing glimpses of a fictional universe that better mirrors our actual one. It matters to me.

“When you’re accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression.”

The discomfort that some may feel from change may be simply losing a bit of their privilege, which should not be confused with oppression or losing rights. More rights for others do not mean fewer rights for me!

Forgetting for a moment that it is very dull indeed to blather on about the same segment of society and forget about the rest, it is important to remember that the systematic exclusion of people is untruthful. Perpetuating these old lies, either it be for reasons of agenda or of laziness, is the same as contributing to the deceit.

Wiser people than me have spoken about race, gender and representation. I can see that the past has held some perfectly good, diverse characters, but that these have been scattered sparsely across a sadly rather homogenous landscape, at least in mainstream media. But now I see more. And better. And more begets more, until it is starting to feel like something is going right.

I see how it resonates with people. I know how it feels for myself. It makes me so happy I could weep. And that is the sum of this post: I want more of this, please, and I will do my best, whether it be by my own production, by voting with my wallet or voice, or by sitting in the audience, listening and learning, to make it continue and grow.

There is a new Doctor in town, and she has been long awaited. As moments go, this is a huge one.


(This was always and only meant as a short post on a portion of a larger momentum, so apologies for the geeky bent, for omitting great films in other genres (e.g. Moonlight) and completely skipping out on other types of media.)

(Posted on March 8th for a reason. Happy International Women’s Day, all!)


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